Letting Go Made Easy, 3 Simple Tips 

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There is nothing more frustrating to me at times than being told to “let it go.” I get that crazy punch-them-in-the-face mental flash, then have to remind myself I’m a yogi and repeat ahimsa, non-violence, until I chill out.

This phrase can trigger me so much because it’s in exactly those moments that I’d love more than anything to “let it go,” but some part of me keeps holding on…to something that’s happened, or might happen…and I feel like screaming, “can’t you see I’m trying!”

The great irony is that I’ve built a life and career around telling/helping people to “let it go.”

As frustrating as it can be I’m passionate about “letting it go” because I know it’s in the letting go that I find my peace, my healing, my wisdom, inner light, purpose and guidance.

It’s pure bliss once I’ve broken the threshold of resistance, either physically or mentally/emotionally with an issue.

Each time I “let go” I promise myself I won’t hold onto grudges or worry or fear or my tight shoulders or hips ever again. Ha! And then life happens and inevitably I’ll cycle back to holding onto something that blocks my energy and brings me down…until I re-remember the path of letting go.

Thankfully I remember a lot more quickly these days and hold on a lot less frequently…and I attribute that shift to a regular practice of yoga, mediation and EFT — three tools that have changed my life and made finding the path of least resistance much easier.

The key is to PRACTICE REGULARLY. I find doing even 5 minutes of meditation, yoga or tapping a day is much much more impactful overall than doing massive sessions rarely.

To me these practises are like short cuts to let go of blockages and BE present.

I was inspired to write this post after listening to an interview for Mindful in May with meditation teacher Mark Coleman yesterday, who said, rather than focus on letting go, focus on letting be. 

He explained that letting go was not something we do but rather a result of letting be. Letting be means observation and acceptance. When we practice these two things, the natural result is a letting go.

I really resonated with that and it made me understand why yoga, meditation and EFT work so well — they are all practices of observation and acceptance.

I want to share with you how to make letting go easier by using these tools in a simple, day to day way.

Breath Body Practice 

To me ANY mindful breath body practice is yoga. Yoga is not just about contorting our bodies into funny poses, it’s really about the mindfulness required to contort our bodies or balance on our hands. That said, doing really simple movements can generate just as much mindfulness.

The point is, when we move our body and connect to our breath, our attention is called to the present moment and our brain chemistry changes — our senses heighten, we feel more, and it causes us to forget about future or past worries (even if just momentarily).

The body can only ever BE IN THE NOW, so any mindful breath body practice creates a state of “being” that leads to letting go.

That’s part of why we feel so damn good after yoga, or come up with solutions that previously evaded us.

TIP: What ever your yoga is (surfing, running, walking, dancing, asana…any mindful movement), do it EVERY DAY as a practice even if just for five minutes, knowing it’s a practice of BEING PRESENT, which creates space to let go.

Meditation

Letting be is a combination of observation and acceptance, and meditation is the mighty act of self observation. 

Through meditation we cultivate an ability to sustain our focus on ourselves without reacting to what we see.

This non-reaction piece is huge. Some days I sit down and my mind is running with so many thoughts I feel leagues away from the ideal vision of peaceful meditation. But I sit anyway and I practice watching all those thoughts.

I can’t stop the thoughts but I can feel separate from them. I can remember I am not my thoughts or sensations, I am just experiencing them. 

This act of not identifying with the thoughts or sensations is so powerful because it leads to letting be and letting go.

We have to practice this mindset, like building muscular strength, and that’s why even when my mediation practice feels far from peaceful I know it’s worth doing.

TIP: Even if you think you don’t know how to meditate and you’re head is full of a thousand and eight thoughts, just pause, close your eyes, sit or stand still, observe those thoughts and remind yourself you are more than your thoughts or sensations. Even one minute a day makes a difference!

E.F.T. — Stands for Emotional Freedom Technique, commonly known as “tapping,” and has been one of the biggest positive influences in my life over the past few years.

It’s so simple that it almost feel ridiculous, but man it’s powerful. (The older I get the more I realise the simple things are often the most powerful).

In the E.F.T. technique we tap on a series of easy to remember points on the body that correlate to the meridian system. Much like acupuncturists needling points to stimulate and move energy (especially stuck energy) tapping stimulates all of the meridian lines, moves energy, and increases somatic awareness.

As you tap these specific points you also state what’s bothering you, where you feel it in your body and then say, “and I love and accept myself anyway.” That’s the basic and anybody can do it

ACCEPTING is the second part of letting be. Sometimes it’s hard to say those simple words “I love and accept.” It feels lame or makes you realise how much you haven’t been accepting. But this may be one of the most potent phrases in the English language!

I’ve found in my own experience and when facilitating a session (I loved this practice so much I recently became a qualified EFT practitioner), is that these simple words coupled with stimulating energy can catalyse an embodiment of acceptance that is both cathartic and profoundly transformational.

TIP: Practice tapping regularly at home (see youtube link). If you can’t remember the pattern juts tap the sternum (breast bone), name out loud the issue, how it feels in your body starting with “Even though xxx…” followed by “I love and accept myself anyway.” End with placing your hands on your heart centre and taking three deep breaths.

I’d love to hear what tools you’ve found in your life help you let be and let go, share with the community below!

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Dealing with My Sh*t in a Sensory Deprivation Float Tank 

images-2This week I tried out the new Sydney Float Centre in Brookvale and admittedly felt nervous about booking my first appointment for an hour long sensory deprivation float tank session.

I’ve always struggled with claustrophobia, but being a yogi and meditator the curiosity to explore weightlessness with no external distractions and gaze inward without the need to adjust a cushion or ignore noises intrigued me enough to get past my fear.

The first four of the eight limbs of yoga aim to prepare us for meditation. The breath, movement, diet and lifestyle of a yogi steer us in the direction of finding inner stillness, which leads to the last four limbs, all focused on meditation.

“Withdrawal of the Senses,” or Pratyahara (the fifth limb) bridges our consciousness from external awareness to internal awareness. It’s the first step of meditation and in an overly stimulated world it can be difficult to achieve. So when I heard about the new Sydney Float Centre in the Northern Beaches, boasting of taking people effortlessly into meditative states I knew I had to try it.

Meditation, Floating and Theta Brainwaves 

Floating, just like meditation, brings people into a theta brain wave state where we are very relaxed but not sleeping, aware but not overly active. We’re in the in-between consicousness, like lucid dreaming. It’s believed that in this theta state we process the experiences of our day and life.

The Ayurvedic system looks at all experiences as consumption, as if we’re eating all the things we hear, see, smell, touch and interact with. We internalise all of it, and just like food we must digest all of life.

Digesting our food means breaking it down, taking up needed nutrients and then eliminating that which is not needed, the waste. And when we don’t eliminate the waste from what we’ve consumed, well, we feel pretty shitty (pun intended).

Yoga and Ayurveda teach us how to digest all parts of our life as best as possible, not just food. But, just like eating food, if we don’t eliminate or let go of the parts of our life that don’t serve us, we end up getting emotionally constipated, and well…feeling pretty shitty.

So much of the healing power of mindfulness relaxation practices like meditation, yoga or floating come from the ability to bring us into the theta brainwave state where we can process and release the experiences of our life.

Sadly, many of us live lives where we don’t take the time on a regular basis to mentally and emotionally let go of the waste. Creating a practice of this is a curtail part of living a healthy life as is actively cleaning out the waste that’s creating blocks within you.

Yoga style detox focuses on cleansing not just with regards to food, but in all areas of our life. In the New Years Yoga Detox starting next Friday we’ll create time, space and systems to process and eliminate physically as well as mentally and emotionally.

Processing In the Float Tank

As soon as I stepped into the room with the alien looking float pod I had a mini freak out about being stuck inside, but Paul the xviyzafe01ilsay40gqicentre directer assured me I was in control of environment at all times.

So I took a deep breath and stepped into the tank and closed the lid. After the first few minutes of nervousness and talking down my claustrophobic feelings I was able to let go and really relax in the  9ft by 6ft spaceship looking pod filled with a water solution of over 500kgs of epsom salt that held me in an anti-gravity feeling float.

Because the water is kept at 35.5 degrees, considered skin-receptor neutral, I started to loose sense of where my skin ended and the water started.

I turned the lights out on the pod, closed the lid to the tank, and in the sound-proof, light-proof room my sense of external world started to dissolve and the awareness of my inner reality became extremely heightened.

I could feel myself slipping into a deep meditative state and enhanced it by using body scanning and deep breathing techniques. I watched as my body, completely free from the pressure of gravity, let go and released tension in areas I didn’t even realise I was holding it. And then I began to watch my mind do the same.

Thoughts, emotions, fears, memories started coming up and there was nothing to distract me from seeing them, feeling them and then just staying in a state of witnessing and experience them past through me until I dissolved back into a state of feeling held and relaxed.

At the end of the session I felt like I was still floating. I felt lighter and could hear my voice sounded more relaxed and at ease. The experience of letting go of all effort, physically and mentally took me to a deep theta wave length state and the crucial act of releasing that which was blocking my system just happened naturally.

More Ways to Experience Theta Brain Waves

  • Meditation
  • Yoga Nidra
  • Deep Breathing, Pranayama
  • Yin Yoga & Restorative Yoga
  • Floating
  • Massage & energy work like Reiki
  • Chanting

Only 4 spots left for the Bali Spirit Retreat I’ll be leading April 1-7

Inquire Here

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