The Grocery Stores Have Gone, What Now?!

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What would you do if you woke up and all grocery stores were shut down, emptied out and there was no place to buy food? Would you know how to feed yourself?

I’d frantically run to all my friend’s who have veggie patches and beg for seeds and off shoots or be left to subsist on the herbs living in my kitchen window. I can only laugh at how long it might take me to catch a fish, and might try harvesting some wild edibles but worry about which one’s were safe.

Wow, this could be the most effective weight loss program ever!

But seriously, I’ve been fascinated this week thinking about how so few of us in the West actually know how to source food from nature. In other words, many of us don’t know how to feed ourselves.

We don’t know how to provide one of the basic necessities of life, and I’ve been wondering how that effects our psyche and society.

We only need three things for survival right? Food, water and shelter (let’s add love to that list for good measure).

Yes we have all of those things in over abundance in modern affluent culture, and yet our society is obsessed with scarcity. Why do we always worry about lack when we have so much? And why do many subsistence cultures in third world countries seem to worry far less about scarcity than we do?

As I’ve explored and discussed this recently, I’m getting a sense that our lack of connection and engagement with the natural source of food has created a deep, primal insecurity that leads to a world view of scarcity, competition and discontent.

Where does your food come from? 

Recently, over the past 50 to 100 years, the majority of western population stopped learning how to plant and grow food, or hunt and forage.

The industrial revolution sent us on a detour further and further away from being part of our natural source of food that we now have epidemics of diseases such as diabetes that come from ingesting “food” who’s origin in nature can hardly be traced.

Maybe part of our over-consumption culture comes from not knowing where nourishment comes from. From feeling like it’s out of our control, and we then gorge in response to the subconscious fear that the lifeline will someday be cut. We stay dissatisfied because don’t know how to provide for ourselves.

People who live off the land face hardships and fears, but in general understand that nature provides all we need. They know how to tap into that wellspring and have control over their primary needs. They understand the pulsation of seasons and cycles, and know that often scarcity is temporary, or seasonal, so worry less about it and exude contentment.

Perhaps the anxiety, fear, constant striving for more and never feeling satisfied pattern I see (and get sucked into myself) could be assuaged by remembering and reconnecting to the inherent abundance provided by the natural world.

Plant-based diets are about connecting to the Earth Yogis eat

In my studies of Ayurveda, which at their core focus on aligning with the rhythms and wisdom of nature, I’ve learned that eating a plant-based diet is a crucial yogi lifestyle habit.

There are many physical health benefits gained from eating a plant based diet such as improved immunity, energy, digestion, better skin, sleep and less inflammation, but I think the greatest benefit of a plant-based diet has to do with how it impacts our world view.

When we focus on plants as our primary source of nutrition, we start to pay more attention to nature. Observing nature reveals a powerful and beautiful truth: the plant kingdom is doing everything it can to support and feed us.

Take a moment right now to reflect on all the ways plants support us — from the air we breath, timber we build with, food we eat, or feed other animals we eat, even to the car’s we drive (petrol after all is fossilised plant matter).

On top of that nature gives us a mind blowing canvas of dynamic beauty, architectural and chemical ingenuity scientists constantly mimic, intelligent communication systems and most importantly, being in nature just makes us feel good.

Eating a plant-based diet reminds us of the inherent support provided by nature and how we’re connected to that. Our world view shifts more toward unity, cooperation, collaboration and support.

When we feel into that support our stress levels drop, our sense of connectivity increases, and our mental and physical health improves. We focus on eating for nourishment and start to avoid low energy, depleting substances.

Eating a plant based diet is a practice of consciously connecting the outer ecosystem to the inner ecosystem, and it may well save our species and planet.

Tips to Upgrade Your Inner and Outer Ecosystems Connection with Plant Based Diet 

  1. Think about where your food comes form in nature. If you can’t identify the natural source of what you’re eating you probably shouldn’t eat it. Anything so processed is low in consciousness, life-force and nutritional value.
  2. Let eating become a trigger for gratitude and nature appreciation. Each time you eat think about the plant source on your plant and the inherent abundance on the planet, feel grateful and relaxed knowing you’re taken care of.
  3. Become actively part of the nourishment cycle and give back to the plants. Start to grow herbs, veggies, sprouts, support local farmers markets and brands that give back to the planet. Start a compost or worm farm and feed the soil. The natural design is symbiosis, only in modern times has that changed. Supporting plants reconnects us to a world view of cooperation and abundances v. competition and scarcity.

What’s your favourite way to connect to Nature? How do you become part of the plant food cycle? Share resources with us, let’s support each other! 

2 thoughts on “The Grocery Stores Have Gone, What Now?!

  1. so true, thank you, eating from our garden within minutes from being picked is very nourishing. Plant food tastes so good when the fruit or veggie is still in an alive state.

  2. Reblogged this on Yoga with Morgan Webert and commented:

    Tomorrow I’ll be teaching a free class as part of the local Earth Hour celebration in collaboration with World Wildlife Fund and Manly Council. This year’s theme is “Planet to Plate” which is all about exploring how and what we eat impacts the health of our planet. I wrote this blog on the exact topic last year, and also on how food/earth consciousness impacts our health, not just physically but mentally and spiritually. I thought it only fitting to re-blog this post. Hope to see you all at the Earth Hour event tomorrow, or simply showing your solidarity by turning all lights off from 8-9pm. Enjoy a candle light dinner! xo Morgan

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